Science and Technology

The Foo Show set, in virtual reality.

What's it like to host a talk show in virtual reality? We talk avatars with Will Smith, host of “The Foo Show.”More

Angry person

Psychologist Lisa Feldman Barrett runs a lab where she studies emotions and says that if you pay attention, everyday anger can be a...More

Plastic crochet corals from the "Crochet Coral Reef" project by Christine and Margaret Wertheim and the Institute For Figuring.

What if the geometric structure of the universe has been hidden, for centuries, in crochet?More

hall of mirrors

The central question of Philip K. Dick's fiction is "What is reality?" Literary critic Umberto Rossi explains that Dick's work often contains many possible realities.More

An egg in a nest

Frank Wilczek is a Nobel Prize-winning physicist at MIT. He's kind of obsessed, in his own way, with understanding the universe. Specifically, he’s interested in what he calls “the beautiful question." Is the universe naturally, inherently beautiful?More

Torah and jad - exhibits in Big Synagogue Museum, Wlodawa - Poland. (CC BY 2.5)

Sometimes you can take math too far. Dig too deep. And end up drowned in your own numbers. This is a story of one famous mathematician’s obsession with the ancient and mystical and numerical world of the Kabbalah.More

Egg

How does the world look to a scientist? We asked astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson….and he gave us some cooking tips.More

Hope Jahren

Nothing makes Hope Jahren happier than tinkering in her lab, studying fossilized plants. More

Freeman Dyson

What he learned from Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr and Richard Feynman.More

scene from "Blade Runner 2049"

If you think you haven't seen any movies based on Philip K. Dick's work, you're probably wrong.  David Gill talks about Hollywood's adaptations of Dick's work.More

trippy mountain

Desperate for help with his PTSD, Dan Kasza took a strange brew of frog venom and ayahuasca.More

Black hole

Researchers revisit the controversial but potentially life-changing treatment first explored in the 1960s.More

AYELET WALDMAN

How taking microdoses of LSD for a month helped her find a calm she hadn’t known for years.More

Radium Girls memorial

How painting radium on watches and instrument dials killed more than 50 young women working in Ottawa, Illinois.More

Clock

He’s one of the most frenetically productive, wired guys on the planet, but digital media theorist Douglas Rushkoff is backing away from the clock.More

Traveling into the phone

Doug Rushkoff believes personal technology is having an insidious effect on our relationship with time. He calls it “present shock.”More

Jaquet Droz automatons

Androids may seem like a modern idea, but there were life-size androids in the 18th century — beautiful robot women who could look around and even play the harpsichord. Historian Heidi Voskuhl tells this remarkable story.More

the next great novel

Will a computer ever write a great novel? Absolutely, says the pioneering software developer Stephen Wolfram. He believes there's no limit to computer creativity.More

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